Sep 282014
 

mars_img Mars Orbiter Mission (MOM), an inter planetary mission to planet Mars, has become a huge success with the satellite entering the designated MARS orbit, a few days back. Indian Prime Minister Mr. Narendra Modi himself witnessed the final orbital maneuvers and congratulated the ISRO and other scientists and engineers who contributed to the successful launch.

Indeed, the MOM experiment is a giant step forward for India. It is notable that India achieved the success on its first attempt itself whereas more advanced countries like, USA took several attempts before realizing the dream. It is widely acknowledged that the mission is very complex in nature, and it took about an year to achieve the feat.

The brief time table for the mission is given below:

It has been configured to carry out observation of physical features of mars and carry out limited study of Martian atmosphere with following five payloads:

  • Mars Colour Camera (MCC)
  • Thermal Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (TIS)
  • Methane Sensor for Mars (MSM)
  • Mars Exospheric Neutral Composition Analyser (MENCA)
  • Lyman Alpha Photometer (LAP)

Various dimensions of the rocket used for the mission are as given below:

Lift-off Mass 1337 kg
Structures Aluminum and Composite Fiber Reinforced Plastic (CFRP) sandwich construction-modified I-1 K Bus
Mechanism Solar Panel Drive Mechanism (SPDM), Reflector & Solar panel deployment
Propulsion Bi propellant system (MMH + N2O4) with additional safety and redundancy features for MOI. Proplellant mass:852 kg
Thermal System Passive thermal control system
Power System Single Solar Array-1.8m X 1.4 m – 3 panels – 840 W Generation (in Martian orbit), Battery:36AH Li-ion
Attitude and Orbit Control System AOCE (Attitude and Orbit Control Electronics): with MAR31750 Processor

Sensors: Star sensor (2Nos), Solar Panel Sun Sensor (1No), Coarse Analogue Sun Sensor

Actuators: Reaction Wheels (4Nos), Thrusters (8Nos), 440N Liquid Engine

Antennae: Low Gain Antenna (LGA), Mid Gain Antenna (MGA) and High Gain Antenna (HGA)
Launch Date Nov 05, 2013
Launch Site SDSC SHAR Centre, Sriharikota, India
Launch Vehicle PSLV – C25

aamangalyan
image courtesy:
http://swapsushias.blogspot.in/2013/11/things-you-must-know-about-isro-mars.html#.VCgpsFJoFxA

Timeline:

Phase Date Event Detail Result
Geocentric phase 5 November 2013 09:08 UTC Launch Burn time: 15:35 min in 5 stages Apogee: 23,550 km
6 November 2013 19:47 UTC Orbit raising manoeuvre Burn time: 416 sec Apogee: 23,550 km to 28,825 km
7 November 2013 20:48 UTC Orbit raising manoeuvre Burn time: 570.6 sec Apogee: 28,825 km to 40,186 km
8 November 2013 20:40 UTC Orbit raising manoeuvre Burn time: 707 sec Apogee: 40,186 km to 71,636 km
10 November 2013 20:36 UTC Orbit raising manoeuvre Incomplete burn Apogee: 71,636 km to 78,276 km
11 November 2013 23:33 UTC Orbit raising manoeuvre
(supplementary)
Burn time: 303.8 sec Apogee: 78,276 km to 118,642 km
15 November 2013 19:57 UTC Orbit raising manoeuvre Burn time: 243.5 sec Apogee: 118,642 km to 192,874 km
30 November 2013, 19:19 UTC Trans-Mars injection Burn time: 1328.89 sec Successful heliocentric insertion
Heliocentric phase December 2013 – September 2014 En route to Mars – The probe travelled a distance of 780,000,000 kilometres (480,000,000 mi) in a parabolic trajectory around the Sun to reach Mars This phase plan included up to four trajectory corrections if needed.
11 December 2013 01:00 UTC 1st Trajectory correction Burn time: 40.5 sec Success
9 April 2014 2nd Trajectory correction (planned) Not required Rescheduled for 11 June 2014
11 June 2014 11:00 UTC 2nd Trajectory correction Burn time: 16 sec Success
August 2014 3rd Trajectory correction (planned) Not require
22 September 2014 3rd Trajectory correction Burn time: 4 sec Success
Areocentric phase 24 September 2014 Mars orbit insertion Burn time: 1388.67 sec Success
 Posted by at 9:04 pm

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